CENTER FOR BEADWORK & JEWELRY ARTS
BEAD STUDIES
Discussion Notes

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The purposes of the bead studies group are manifold, including to explore new methods of beading, to experiment with variations on traditional techniques, and to study culture-specific beading techniques. The group meets in Nashville, Tennessee the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays from 1-3pm.

If you are in the area, please join us in our discussions. There are no fees.

Current Bead Study Discussion Blog


COPYRIGHTING YOUR WORK

CENTER FOR BEADWORK & JEWELRY ARTS
BEAD STUDY

Several months ago, there was an editorial in Bead & Button about
copyrighting, intellectual property and using other people's work.
That editor defined some very tight rules about what should be
considered unethical. Editors of other bead and craft magazines
continued this discussion in their own publications, with some
variation about where to draw the line.

Where do you think the line should be drawn? And why?

Here are some typical situations: Ethical or Unethical?


1. You copy a pattern in a magazine for personal use

2. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others.

3. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others. However, you change the color palette.

4. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others. However, you make changes in the types of beads used.

5. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others. However, you change the design somewhat.

6. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.

7. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.
However, you change the color palette.

8. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.
However, you make changes in the types of beads used.

9. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.
However, you change the design somewhat.

10. You learn a new technique developed by a well-known bead artist.
You use that technique to create a piece to sell or teach about.

11. You create a piece on your own, but find out it almost exactly
matches a piece by another artist, who has published an article about
it in a magazine this past year. ...5 years ago. ....25 years
ago. ...300 years ago.

12. You try to recreate a piece you see a photo of in a magazine or
catalog.

13. You take a photo of a piece in a jewelry store that you later try
to recreate.

14. Your students copy the piece you taught them, and they are
selling these.

15. You duplicate a piece you've seen, but improve upon all the
materials used -- stringing supplies, clasps, beads, finishes.


The original editorial begs these questions:

Should magazines publish how-to instructions if it is unethical to
copy them?

Should teachers teach if they do not want their work copied?

Should teachers be allowed to leave out certain steps or advice, when
teaching how to do something, to prevent their projects from getting
copies?

If something is defined as "unethical", should there be
consequences? what would these be? who would enforce them?

Please respond to this group with your comments,

Thanks,

Warren


Re:Discussion Question for December 2006


CENTER FOR BEADWORK & JEWELRY ARTS
BEAD STUDY

Several months ago, there was an editorial in Bead & Button about
copyrighting, intellectual property and using other people's work.
That editor defined some very tight rules about what should be
considered unethical. Editors of other bead and craft magazines
continued this discussion in their own publications, with some
variation about where to draw the line.

Where do you think the line should be drawn? And why?

Here are some typical situations: Ethical or Unethical?

1. You copy a pattern in a magazine for personal use> Ethical

2. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others.> Ethical

3. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others. However, you change the color palette.> Ethical

4. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others. However, you make changes in the types of beads used.> Ethical

5. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can teach that pattern to
others. However, you change the design somewhat.> Ethical

6. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.> Ethical

7. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.
However, you change the color palette.> Ethical

8. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.
However, you make changes in the types of beads used.> Ethical

9. You copy a pattern in a magazine so you can sell these pieces.
However, you change the design somewhat.> Ethical

10. You learn a new technique developed by a well-known bead artist.
You use that technique to create a piece to sell or teach about.> Ethical

11. You create a piece on your own, but find out it almost exactly
matches a piece by another artist, who has published an article about
it in a magazine this past year. ...5 years ago. ....25 years
ago. ...300 years ago.> Ethical

12. You try to recreate a piece you see a photo of in a magazine or
catalog.> Ethical

13. You take a photo of a piece in a jewelry store that you later try
to recreate. > Ethical

14. Your students copy the piece you taught them, and they are
selling these. > Ethical

15. You duplicate a piece you've seen, but improve upon all the
materials used -- stringing supplies, clasps, beads, finishes.> Ethical

The original editorial begs these questions:

Should magazines publish how-to instructions if it is unethical to copy them?
I feel it is Ethical to use how-to instructions. I've never heard this argument in "Handyman".
If the magazines stop publishing how-to instructions, I would stop buying the magazines.
What if all the "How-To" books and magazines said look but don't touch? Do share
knowledge with others. Don't teach. Don't learn. All schools would have to close. We would be living out side, as we could have no houses, no furniture, no clothes, no food, no flowers. And probably, there would be no "we".

Should teachers teach if they do not want their work copied?
First, the teacher was a student. To Teach applies to any manner of imparting information or skill so that others may learn. To Learn: To acquire experience of or an ability or a skill. The idea of being a teacher is to share knowledge and hope your students learn, improve upon
and use the information you have given them.

What if all teachers said I'll share what I know and give you my skills, BUT you can't give or share or sale the knowledge I've sold to you! If all teachers took that stand, we wouldn't even be alive now.


Should teachers be allowed to leave out certain steps or advice, when teaching how to do something, to prevent their projects from getting copies?
NO! That's Unethical and Fraud. Taking money for something they know won't work!

If something is defined as "unethical", should there be consequences? what would these be? who would enforce them?

I say, if you have something you don't want shared or copied, then you have to be the only one that has that knowledge. As someone said, Two people can keep a secret, if one of them is dead.


Frances K Hare
www.deliveringonthepromise.com/Frances


Re:Discussion Question for December 2006


I must add... The students have to buy the magazine and/or book for the instructions. Instead of the teacher providing copies of them.

Fran


RE: [beadstudy] Re:Discussion Question for December 2006


Fran, thanks. Some great points and insights.


It also always concerns me, as a teacher, and as someone who owns a bead shop, how many people, either avoid showing their pieces to anyone for fear of someone copying them, or avoid doing beadwork altogether, for fear they might be copying others.



Warren


Re: [beadstudy] Discussion Question for December 2006


This has been an ongoing debate in our beading group as well, and my additional question is:
How do designers get compensated for their time and designs if they are not protected in some way? Plus to defend their copyrights, they must employ the legal system to gain re-imbursement or create a cease & desist order, now cutting into any profit they may have made.

The closest thing I can come to a solution is to set a time period (perhaps one year) that the pattern/design is exclusive to the designer and then it's a free-for-all.

Thanks for this engaging topic


Marilyn Earhart
See my bead work at
Divine Ms M Designs
http://www.PictureTrail.com/divinemsm1


I have seen discussions on this subject for over 20 years. Thus, there seems to be NO clear cut answer.

Everyone will say yes, and no to different questions, and can back the choice with good "reasons". That is why there are lawyers and judges.

I saw some polymer clay pieces on the web for sale that looked like Christi Friesen's stuff, and it was not quite as perfect as I would have imagined hers to have been. In the text description, was a statement that the article was created in the manner of CF, and credited CF, and said she had permission to sell it.

CF in a recent article in the National Polymer Clay Guild magazine/newsletter - if I remember it correctly - said she encouraged people to learn to use the medium, and as long as she was credited with the "style" (my word, not hers), and let her know, she was glad for the encouragement of other artists.

When I was in the Houston Polymer Clay Guild meeting, that sort of thing came up at the table and Judith Skinner, Patterson, Karen ?, and Sarajane all knew an artist that would NOT NOT discuss how she did a technique, and was not helpful to others who liked her work. They did not approve.

I remember a discussion about a beader of note who had the same attitude in a class there in Nashville. Would not show or help others, but in the long run took what was done in class and made it her own.

When one copies a piece of art, even changing colors or sizes of ingredients, the first artist that was responsible for the published article and the creation of the original NEEDS to be credited. Quilters have the same problem because there are such detailed directions given for many of the New Techniques.

I guess it all means, respect for the artist. Like saying THANK YOU to folks who do small favors, and acknowledging their skill, talent, and art.

I strongly disagree with "knock-offs" which are imitations of an article for profit and it is a form of lying and cheating. The Smithsonian one year took 4 patterns from his heirloom collection of quilts and had them made up in the orient and sold them for under $100? The hue and cry that went up amongst historians and quilters alike for undervaluing our national treasure and heritage was so immense that the quilts were eventually withdrawn from the market.

Like the kids trading CD's and copying them so they get the songs for free?

Never ending, ain't it.

regards, d
Donna B. Hogan
Hogan's in Middle Tennessee
Since 1795


RE: [beadstudy] Discussion Question for December 2006


11/30/06

Marilyn,

Thanks for your insights.

I personally think that if you send your pattern to a magazine (or book or website or whatever) for publication for a general audience, you are placing that pattern in the public domain for anyone to use anyway they want.

Ethically, I think if someone then uses that pattern, they should reference and acknowledge the designer in some way.

In this case, the designer has traded some technical knowledge for recognition, and the designer can use that increased recognition anyway they want.



Warren


 

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